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The new I Can't Change It is a bona fide gem

Steve Morse, Professor of Rock 'n Roll, Berklee
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New Album: Can’t Change it

THE MYSTIX proudly announce the release of their 7th album Can’t Change It, produced by legendary drummer Marco Giovino. Marco brings his eclectic vision and brilliant sense of style to this new project. Can’t Change It expands the band’s unique sound utilizing singer/songwriter Jo Lily’s captivating deep-throated vocals as a centerpiece, backed by guitarist extraordinaire, Bobby Keyes, and a group of elite Boston musicians and special guests, creating a truly original and engaging album.

Jo Lily and Bobby Keyes are the heart and soul of THE MYSTIX. Joe has been a part of the Boston music scene since the 70’s when he was with the iconic New England band Duke and the Drivers. Bobby Keyes has been a top studio musician for the likes of Mary J. Blige, Little Wayne Jerry Lee Lewis, etc. This project also features a truly outstanding line-up of musicians consisting of Tom West, Marty Ballou, Duke Levine and Marco Giovino, with special guests Luther and Cody Dickinson (The North Mississippi Allstars) and legendary Charlie McCoy to create a funky, rootsy, soulful sound guaranteed to lift your spirits.

Can’t Change It continues the band’s tradition of crafted originals and obscure traditional American roots music. The dynamic percussion beats, soulful ballads and a driving guitar throughout, give this new album an energy that represents a seismic shift in the band’s sound. This album is lean and mean.

Renowned for their live performances, THE MYSTIX have always preferred to limit their performances to a few choice venues. Though it may be some time before we get a chance to see them perform again, Can’t Change It more than makes up for this. Producer Marco Giovino creates a textured, but pared-down sound that features the band’s thoughtful, creative nature, drawing you inward and leaving you wanting more.

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1) Outlaw Blues

One of Bob Dylan‘s early electric blues classics, featuring Mike Bloomfield on lead guitar, initially released in 1965 on his album Bringing It All Back Home. The Mystix’s interpretation, along with Dylan’s lyrics make the song as relevant today as it always was.

2) Ain’t Gonna Cry

Originally co-written and recorded by Timi Yuro, legendary Vegas Torch/R&B singer. Considered one of the pioneers of “blue-eyed soul.” After Marco presented the song to Jo, he insisted on recording the track. Jo tweaked the lyrics to fit the male perspective.

3) Carrie

Written by singer Jo Lily. This song was written years back and was nearly forgotten. When Marco, the producer, heard it, he insisted they go to studio to record.

4) Let’s Get Started

Co-written by Jo and Bobby, this tune references the many years and many live performances throughout The Mystix’s careers. These are the last words before the band goes on stage typically, “let’s get started.”

5) Jumper On The Line

The Mystix are joined by the North Mississippi All-Stars in performing this R.L. Burnside song. Together the two bands create their own interpretation of this swampy classic, featuring Luther Dickinson on the slide and Cody Dickinson on electric washboard.

6) Bottle Of Whiskey

Written by the great Frankie Miller (Scottish songwriter, singer extraordinaire). Jo has been a disciple of Frankie‘s since he opened for him in the early 70s. Jo says, “this song is like a hymn to me.” Featuring the legendary player Charlie McCoy (Roy Orbison, Cash, Elvis, Bob Dylan) on harmonica.

7) Brand New Love

Adding his lyrics to a John Lee Hooker feel, the new version of Brand New Love was done in one take. A real deep boogie feel.

8) Wouldn’t Mind Dying, (If Dyin’ was All)

This is one of the oldest classic gospel songs in the American gospel songbook. Written by Washington Phillips in 1927, Wouldn’t Mind Dying has been recorded extensively within the African American gospel community. The song was later recorded by the Carter Family in the early 1930s.

9) Backstreet Girl

Originally by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, an example of some of the early Rolling Stones melodies, showing that Richards and Jagger were more than just rock ‘n’ roll artists and could pen hauntingly beautiful ballads.

10) That’s All That’s All

Another tune that was written by Jo, using two of his favorite influences, The Reverend Julius Cheeks and Bo Diddley! Simple as that - That’s All.

11) I Can’t Change It

Another great Frankie Miller ballad said to have been written when he was only 12 or 13 years old. One of the band’s favorite tunes, The Mystix, has been performing this song live for years, finally recording it for Can’t Change It.

12) Going To The River

A classic street blues from the master himself, Jimmy Reed. The Mystix kept the arrangement simple, 12 string guitar, a rhythm section, and a fiddle by Kathleen Parks.

13) Dreamers Holiday

The Mystix take a musical journey back into the early ’50s. Dreamers Holiday is a tribute to Bobby’s first guitar teacher, as this pop track was his favorite song.

14) Jumper On The Line (Edited)

Shortened for radio airplay, this tune still has all the raucous swampy feel as the extended album version. The North Mississippi All-Stars really shine on this one!

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1) Outlaw Blues

One of Bob Dylan‘s early electric blues classics, featuring Mike Bloomfield on lead guitar, initially released in 1965 on his album Bringing It All Back Home. The Mystix’s interpretation, along with Dylan’s lyrics make the song as relevant today as it always was.

2) Ain’t Gonna Cry

Originally co-written and recorded by Timi Yuro, legendary Vegas Torch/R&B singer. Considered one of the pioneers of “blue-eyed soul.” After Marco presented the song to Jo, he insisted on recording the track. Jo tweaked the lyrics to fit the male perspective.

3) Carrie

Written by singer Jo Lily. This song was written years back and was nearly forgotten. When Marco, the producer, heard it, he insisted they go to studio to record.

4) Let’s Get Started

Co-written by Jo and Bobby, this tune references the many years and many live performances throughout The Mystix’s careers. These are the last words before the band goes on stage typically, “let’s get started.”

5) Jumper On The Line

The Mystix are joined by the North Mississippi All-Stars in performing this R.L. Burnside song. Together the two bands create their own interpretation of this swampy classic, featuring Luther Dickinson on the slide and Cody Dickinson on electric washboard.

6) Bottle Of Whiskey

Written by the great Frankie Miller (Scottish songwriter, singer extraordinaire). Jo has been a disciple of Frankie‘s since he opened for him in the early 70s. Jo says, “this song is like a hymn to me.” Featuring the legendary player Charlie McCoy (Roy Orbison, Cash, Elvis, Bob Dylan) on harmonica.

7) Brand New Love

Adding his lyrics to a John Lee Hooker feel, the new version of Brand New Love was done in one take. A real deep boogie feel.

8) Wouldn’t Mind Dying, (If Dyin’ was All)

This is one of the oldest classic gospel songs in the American gospel songbook. Written by Washington Phillips in 1927, Wouldn’t Mind Dying has been recorded extensively within the African American gospel community. The song was later recorded by the Carter Family in the early 1930s.

9) Backstreet Girl

Originally by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, an example of some of the early Rolling Stones melodies, showing that Richards and Jagger were more than just rock ‘n’ roll artists and could pen hauntingly beautiful ballads.

10) That’s All That’s All

Another tune that was written by Jo, using two of his favorite influences, The Reverend Julius Cheeks and Bo Diddley! Simple as that - That’s All.

11) I Can’t Change It

Another great Frankie Miller ballad said to have been written when he was only 12 or 13 years old. One of the band’s favorite tunes, The Mystix, has been performing this song live for years, finally recording it for Can’t Change It.

12) Going To The River

A classic street blues from the master himself, Jimmy Reed. The Mystix kept the arrangement simple, 12 string guitar, a rhythm section, and a fiddle by Kathleen Parks.

13) Dreamers Holiday

The Mystix take a musical journey back into the early ’50s. Dreamers Holiday is a tribute to Bobby’s first guitar teacher, as this pop track was his favorite song.

14) Jumper On The Line (Edited)

Shortened for radio airplay, this tune still has all the raucous swampy feel as the extended album version. The North Mississippi All-Stars really shine on this one!

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